Thinking

Consider the simple act of driving a car, a complex set of rules, constant movement at high speeds, the need to track visual information about your car, the whereabouts of half a dozen other cars, trucks, cyclists, pedestrians, lights, signs, all the while ignoring dozens of stimulus on the roadside, thousand of distractions attempting to get your attention.

Half seconds matter as you traverse 30 meters a second at 100km/hr. How is it possible? It turns out you do it by not thinking. Your brain is incredibly well adapted, it is a specialized mechanism for spatial self-awareness that combines visual cues (seeing) with body motion (reaching). These skills are transferable to the automobile, more often than not.

Fine tuned over the last million years of things chasing and trying to eat you, if it was not a sabre tooth tiger it was who ever wanted the scrap of whatever you managed to find in the dirt.

Reacting is natural and its easy to press buttons and make people do things, Pavlov’s dogs showed us that. Thinking on the other hand is a learned process and has always been a luxury. Until now. We are now many billions of people and we still need to react quickly. The difference is today we need coordinated change and we need to think deeply about our next move.

Will we pull off the transition from reacting to thinking? That is the ten billion person question.

Thinking is a learned process, these articles talk about the process and my bias. Understanding, or at least reflecting on your bias is a good place to start when thinking.

We all have a bias, mine is out there for all to see.

Never listen to anyone who tells you what to think, but how to think, that is skill worth learning.